We never see Fred Flintstone getting ON the dinosaur, just sliding off at 5:00 on the dot.

What are your feelings about being on time for work?

Faithful Reader Paula H&B has been a, you know, faithful reader for something like 92 years. She might be the funniest commentor, and don’t get mad at me cause you know she’s funny.

The point is, on social media, she’s been complaining because a coworker of hers keeps showing up at 9:00 on the dot. The coworker’s start time? Is 9:00. But she’s a new employee, and it’s irking H&B that she’s not getting there a few minutes early.

The second day that H&B commented on this, and people were all, Yeah, wow, that sucks, I said something. I believe it was sensitive and understanding, and really opened up the dialogue so we could have a measured discussion. It was something like, What the fuck is up your ass, for god’s sake? She’s there on time.

My job is a creative job, and we have flex time, and while technically I’m supposed to get there around 8:30 it’s really closer to 9:00. When they switched bosses on me, I asked my boss if that was something that was going to annoy him and he said no. I stay past 5:00 as a rule, and I certainly work nights and weekends if there’s extra work, but me being there at 8:30 or 8:50 makes pretty much zero difference, as no one is champing at the bit for me to get anything done right then. My deadlines are almost always for 5 p.m. on whatever day, or sometimes a chilling 2:00.

I never miss deadlines.

So, in my opinion, and I say this because it’s how I am, if one is bad at mornings, if one has to pill a dog and feed him and let him out and feed two other cats and then schlep down the hall and feed a kitten–just to throw a random scenario out there–and shower and put on makeup and try to squeeze one’s enormous, never-weighed-this-much self into clothes and incidentally blog, if one is bad at managing how long these things take, but one gets all her work done, hoooo care if she’s late?

But H&B has serious feelings about getting in a little early, and my strolling in whenever would give her seven heart attacks.

Now, when it comes to lateness in life, that bugs. I used to be friends with a woman who was always, always late. I can’t begin to tell you how many times I hung around, waiting 20, even 40 minutes till she deigned to show up.

Being late when your friends are waiting is akin to saying, “My time matters more than yours.” And I assure you that what was taking time was her hair. I assure you. She was part of my past taste in women friends: The Nervous Perfectionist. I have no idea why the NP was my type for awhile, but it was.

I moved on to the Charismatic Narcissist, and have also gotten past that and now I seem to favor the More Practical Than Me But Still Funny woman, which seems to be a good fit for me. Lilly, The Alexes, Kaye, The Other Copy Editor, The Poet.

Anyway. There was quite a bit of discussion on this on H&B’s poor Facebook page yesterday, so I wondered what your thoughts were on getting to work on time.

Do tell.

I gotta go, I’m late for work. Bah.

106 thoughts on “We never see Fred Flintstone getting ON the dinosaur, just sliding off at 5:00 on the dot.

  1. If you punch a clock, as long as you punch in on time, that is fine but when you are working a salary job you don’t have to be on time. You get paid for the work you do, not the hours you work. But if you are hourly I am a big believer in flex time, if you start a little later, work a bit later. And if you have time to notice what time I come in than you don’t have enough to do. Just my opinion but we have that problem at my office where everyone likes to be in everyone’s business and if I was boss I would ask them if they needed more work since they have time for all this bs.

    Like

    1. I tend to agree DG in Niagara Falls, however, i think there is a lot that needs to be taken into consideration. My department is a mix a salary, non-exempt and union employees. Our salary staff members have more flexibility in attendance time. However, there are a few salary staff members that we have written up and they have signed documentation proving they understand the core hours of their required attendance. One in particular has a start time of 8:00am however he was showing up anywhere from 5:30am to 10:30 am – a 5 hour start time window is not acceptable. Nonexempt and union employees per institutional policy have a 7 minute window of flexibility. They can clock in up to 7 minutes early or 7 minutes late. Our hourly personnel have a lot less flexibility than our exempt staff.

      Like

  2. What DG said. HOWEVER, if you come in exactly on time, but then fiddle around for the next 40 minutes paying your personal bills (yes, we had someone do that all the time) and not actually getting settled in and getting to actual WORK, then I have a problem.

    Like

  3. My work is similar. No one has a time they have to be there. Some people do take advantage of this and appear in the office between 9:00-4:00 then head out. We also have telecommute days set by the employee up to twice a week. As long as everyone gets their work done, no one in management seems to really care. I know it bothers some Paula H&B types in my office, but it’s not an overall concern at all.

    Like

      1. I guess I’m a Paula H&B type. If I am supposed to be there at 8:00 then I am there no later than 7:45. If I am supposed to get off at 5:00 you will find me still at my desk at 5:15. I used to work in an office, an office of which I was the manager, and I had a co-worker who would show up whenever she damn well felt like it. Drove me crazy. I finally asked her if she understood that start time meant she should be ready to start work at the designated time and not just waltz in and act as if the whole world should stop what they are doing whilst she prepared for her day futzing with her coffee and telling us of her exploits from the night before. She got angry and told me that it took her longer to prepare to work than others and that I would just have to deal with it. I did not and she was gone the next day. So yeah I’m THAT type. Now that being said I now work my own schedule and do whatever the hell I want. Somedays I start at eight sharp and some days I show up at noon still in my pajamas and bed head because I can. However, when I have to be some where at a designated time I am early.
        What can I say. I’m a Virgo.

        Liked by 1 person

    1. Do NOT get me started on the part-timer we had. Worked one day a week and spent her time here making hair appointments, ordering crap online, etc. Notice she’s in the past tense.

      Like

      1. You would have hated the woman I worked with at my first job out of college. First of all, she was already part time, meaning she worked 3 days a week in her case. She would work maybe — MAYBE — 4-5 hours on the days she was there. And she’d spend at least 2 hours on the phone yelling at her ex with whome she shared a son or her neighbor, with whom she shared a driveway. Lord. And she did all this with a super loud voice. Relaxing. I complained to my boss about her, and my boss made me confront my colleague. Not only was this woman doing all these annoying things, but she was also a foot taller than I am and at least 15-20 years older than I was. Anyway, I asked her to be quieter and not make so many personal phone calls, which was met with resistance. At least she knew I was mad?

        Liked by 1 person

  4. I am personally a follower of the “on time means five minutes early” rule, with the exception of parties. If you say your party begins at 8, I’m not showing up until 8:30.

    In gossipy anecdote news, I was an employee of a large corporation that had an unwritten rule that you show up ten to fifteen minutes early to start up your computer, get the zillions of programs we needed to do our job fired up, and generally get our ducks in a row. It was also an unwritten rule that we wouldn’t be compensated for that time. Guess what? My co-workers and I joined a class action lawsuit, won, and received big ol’ checks as a result.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. See, that’s how I view it – if you’re only paying me to be at work 9 to 5, or 8 hours, then I’m only going to be there 8 hours!

      Like

    2. We had people showing up an hour early just to fiddle around until work started at 8 and the big bosses were afraid the employees were going to work during that time and not claim it as work time. As you mentioned that could land the organization in hot water with DOL, so now our doors are locked until 7:30 each morning. Who wants to show up an hour early to work each day if they can’t even use flex time?

      Like

  5. At one time I had job where I was written up for being one minute late. That boss obviously felt the same way that Paula H&B does. My current boss doesn’t consider you late until you’re 5 minutes late but I always tried to get to work at least 10 or 15 minutes early because I have so much work I get done that it’s just too hectic if I show up at 8 o’clock on the dot. I have a coworker who is perpetually late and I must admit it does bug. I totally agree with you that lateness in life is a different thing. My husband and I go to lunch with my parents and my mom’s two sisters every Saturday and my two aunts are late every single time. It doesn’t matter what time we tell them to be there, they will be late. And you’re right, it does make you feel like they think their time is more important than yours.

    Like

    1. I wouldn’t write you up for being one minute late!! I’m not a Clock Nazi!! I’m just saying, as a New Employee, I expected a little more effort. I am allowing for the fact that she may still be working out her commute,etc. And if she’s equally relaxed about her departure and gets her work done, it will be fine.

      Like

      1. Oh I just meant that she was the type of boss who expected her employees to be prepared to start working at 8 and not walking in the door at 8, so when you’re walking in the door at 8:01, and keep in mind this was in a hospital so the time clock was downstairs, that meant by the time you got upstairs to your desk at the clinic it was probably about 8:10. So she really had every right to write me up. I learned a lot of hard lessons at that job.

        Liked by 1 person

          1. I don’t think so! Her name was Evelyn. To her credit she let my tardiness slide so often that she actually got in trouble and that’s why she had to start writing me up. I was a different person then, lots of personal issues. I’ve grown up a lot since then.

            Like

  6. I agree with June. This is exactly how my office operates. I have the kind of job where I work when I need to work and that does sometimes include nights and weekends on my laptop. I worked for a long time with people who couldn’t mind their own business and now I just don’t have time for it. We have one guy in our office who seems to think he’s everybody’s manager and he glances several times at his wrist watch or makes a point of showing up at your door the moment you get into the office. Not surprising, but nobody actually likes this guy.

    Like

    1. We had an employee former that kept a journal of everyone’s arrival, break, lunch, smoke and departure times. When she was upset at someone she would make a photo copy of their section of her journal and anonymously post it on the bulletin board.
      If she had enough time to do all that, I figured we obviously didn’t have enough work to justify her position. One meeting explaining that to her and she cleaned up her attitude a little, still it was only about 6 months after I arrived that I terminated her. Sadly timekeeping journals were not her only fault

      Like

  7. Preach, DG! My fmr office was weird about being on time, but only with certain people. They hassled some people (me) for being late some mornings even though I NEVER left on time in the evenings, but then another co-worker in particular would come in 20-30 minutes late every single morning for about 40 years and no one said a word. We had the same job, so it wasn’t hourly vs salary. The difference in treatment of some people vs others is what irked me. I generally did not notice when people came in because I didn’t care! I did start to care, however, when I was the one given a hard time.

    I’m almost fascinated that someone can walk in at exactly the same time every single morning. I can do the exact same thing every morning: get up at the same time, do the same things getting ready, and I don’t think I ever arrived at work at the same time, two mornings in a row. I can just imagine the on-time person standing outside the office staring at their watch until it’s exactly 8:57, and then walking into the building.

    I am frequently late by 5-10 minutes to things. Not because I think I’m special – I just usually have a bad concept of how long it’s going to take to get somewhere. I saw something in Huffington Post that creative and intelligent people are more prone to being late because they have a different concept of time. I like to console myself with that fact. Of course, I’m talking about 5-10 min late. People who hold everyone up for an hour or two – they’re the ones who I believe think their time is more important.

    Like

  8. I definitely think your particular job or industry has a lot to do with it. I work in healthcare and we are expected to be available during business hours which are Monday through Friday 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. We don’t necessarily have the flexibility to say oh I get my 8 hours done because if we’re not available during business hours it really doesn’t help our clients much.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. So if I show up at 8 o’clock on the dot and I have to get my computer booted up and go get my coffee and get settled in for the day, by the time I’m really ready to start working at around 8:15 or 8:30 I’ve already missed calls and my emails are piling up and I have voicemails and my day is just off to a hectic start.

      Liked by 1 person

    2. Case in point, at my current company, the manager we had before our previous one was a sufferer of migraines. By 3 p.m. every afternoon she would have a migraine and would go home, so she came in at 6 a.m. every day. She still ended up being let go because she was not available during the time that our members and employees needed her. I was really sad for her because I also get migraines but not nearly that bad but they never affected my job like that. She was a great manager.

      Like

  9. I gotta agree with Paula. If you start at 8:00, that means you start working at 8:00, not roll in the door at 8:00 or 8:05 or 8:10. If you are supposed to be working at 8:00 and it’s now 8:10, but you’re not in yet and I’m having to do your job because I’m here and you’re not, then we’re going to have a problem.

    Liked by 2 people

  10. Hahahaha!! I see some strong opinions Couple of things: One, I don’t know New Coworker’s work habits yet. If she gets her work done and is equally flexible about what time she leaves, I won’t care if she’s a few minutes late. But I don’t know that yet. All I DO know is that for her first two days, she slid in at 8:57ish, had her keys in her hand at 4:58 and Flintstoned out at the crack of 5:00. IMO, as a new employee, a greater effort should be made to show she’s not a clock-watcher. Secondly, we are a small office (law firm) so it is impossible not to notice what everyone else is doing and what time they arrive/depart. I feel we should be here and ready to go at 9:00, when the clients start calling, etc. I don’t think we should still be hanging up our coat, logging on to the computer and generally getting set for the day after 9:00. As I said on FB yesterday, by 9:00: Coat hung up, coffee poured, computer/phone logged on, ass in seat, ready to work.

    Like

  11. I do think it depends on your job. I work in a school, so being on time is critical. We live and die by the bell. And if you don’t show up on time that means someone else is covering your business AND theirs for however long it takes you to get your ass in your chair. In general I am a “5 minutes early is 10 minutes late” kind of employee, but in this job I get here early because that allows me to start my day without kids breathing down my neck. When the masses arrive, I’m ready to serve. Then if I spend a few minutes, oh, say READING A BLOG, I feel like I earned those minutes.

    I had a co-worker fmr who used to get here right on the dot and then spend 40 minutes fooling with her elaborate coffee routine. Sure you’re at work on time, buy you aren’t ready TO WORK on time. The same co-worker fmr used to take her lunch break and then come back WITH HER LUNCH and proceed to eat it at her desk. Huh? Did I mention fmr.

    Great conversation starter June!

    Liked by 1 person

    1. I worked as a school guidance counselor. I’d arrive 45 minutes early to get my coffee, get settled, do some paperwork, and review who I needed to see that day. I was ready to see students as soon as they arrived. Counselor in the office next door arrived after the bell rang and would tell kids to sit in the outer office and wait while she got her self together. Oh it irked me. These kids were missing instructional time sitting and waiting on an adult who needed to get her coffee, make idle chit chat, use the restroom, etc. And yes, she left as soon as the afternoon bell rang. I swear I don’t know how she kept her job.

      Liked by 1 person

  12. I agree with Paula. I was always 20 to 30 minutes early when I worked, and, yes, I immediately started working. But you better believe I was out of there at 4:30 sharp. It bugs me no end when people can’t be on time for work Or on time, period. If you have that much to do in the morning, seems to me you need to get up a bit earlier. I believe being constantly late is a sigh of disrespect.

    Liked by 1 person

  13. I agree with Paula. I was always 20 to 30 minutes early when I worked, and, yes, I immediately started working. But you better believe I was out of there at 4:30 sharp. It bugs me no end when people can’t be on time for work. Or on time, period. If you have that much to do in the morning, seems to me you need to get up a bit earlier. I believe being constantly late is a sign of disrespect.

    Like

  14. You can’t teach work ethic and I do get where Just Paula is coming from with wanting to make a good impression and get the feel of the office before you start with the clock watching.

    Liked by 1 person

  15. I am always 10 minutes early, if I am on time, I am late. I am like that in life as well. Why would parties start at a certain time if the Host didn’t care what time people showed up? I worked one job as a salaried employee, But had to punch in and out anyway. The company got Audited and we all got big, fat, retroactive checks. Now I want to get paid for every minute I am on the clock. One fellow employee showed up 10 minutes late EVER DAY, I asked her why and she said that’s how she likes to plan her day! I almost punched her

    Liked by 1 person

  16. I feel like if you’re running a business/you’re responsible for opening the doors to the public and I’m you’re customer, I appreciate you being on time if I’ve come at your posted hours.

    If I’m you’re co-worker and it is a once in awhile thing, I’m happy to cover if you’re a few minutes late. On the third hand, I used to work with a woman who took 40 minutes to get herself together once she got to the office – this included making her breakfast, getting a drink, using the bathroom, stopping at each office to greet, then she would commence settling at her desk to eat. In reality, she didn’t start work until an hour after she arrived which, yes, bugged me to no end because other than the initial greeting, she didn’t like to be approached. Things come up that need to be addressed in the first hour of the day! After awhile, I started subtly suggesting that she eat breakfast at home but she asked why when she got paid to do it in the morning and use the office kitchen for it (someone else cleaned/shopped). Dedicated employee, she was.

    Liked by 1 person

  17. I had a long commute in Atlanta, so I could leave at the same time every day but depending on traffic, could be right on time or 5-10 minutes late. Of course, I could have left earlier but have a hard time getting up in the morning. I got more than my share of work done, stayed late if needed and my boss didn’t care. I was a partner with the firm and worked there 32 years, but suddenly one of the bitches who worked for me decided she could do the same thing. I hate having women work for me, there is such a fine line between being friends and being boss.

    Like

  18. I guess it depends on the job. Mr. Munroe’s former secretary was always late, frequently asked to leave early, & her kids were “sick” all the damn time. The cherry on top of that sundae was her sandpaper personality. This was not a good combo platter for a law office. When the phone usually starts ringing 30 minutes before doors open, it’s important to have someone there on time to answer. His current secretary is the polar opposite of Ol’ Sandy.

    I had a high school girl working for me at the vet clinic who tested my patience with her tardiness. We’ll call her Dopey. She was part of our kennal staff & it was important to be there on time. A vet clinic kennal room doesn’t smell so fresh at 8am. Dopey was such a sweet girl..not so bright though. She didn’t last very long.

    Liked by 1 person

  19. Like Queen Marcy, I live in Atlanta and the commute time is a crap shoot in this city. My mom said a guy from NYC told her when he lived there he knew exactly what time he would be somewhere depending on when he left. When he moved down here he was amazed that the same commute could take 20 minutes or it could take an hour because you never know what traffic is going to be like. And I recently met a guy who moved here from Los Angeles and he said traffic here is worse than there and can’t believe that there is traffic almost 24 hours a day. So I aim to be at work sometime between 9 and 9:30. My four attorneys kind of saunter in whenever as well because everyone understands traffic is crazy. But I also regularly clock out and work off the clock until 7 or 8 because we’re not supposed to have overtime, but I stay to get my crap done. And we have 3 receptionists so I don’t have to worry about if clients call or come in before I’m here.

    Liked by 1 person

      1. Not a lawyer and don’t play one on TV, but it sounds as if the employer is in violation of the Fair Labor Standards Act by “allowing” (I know it is by choice) Beverly to work extra unpaid hours. And a legal secretary doesn’t qualify under the FLSA to be an exempt (salaried) employee. The rules are actually pretty strict. The only reason I’m familiar with this is that my employer double-checked every single job code last year (and re-classified some salaried folks as hourly) in anticipation of a new stricter version of the FLSA (that is currently in legal limbo.)

        Liked by 1 person

  20. I’m curious about the friend personality types you described. Are these terms you created? If so, that’s a great topic for a column or book.

    On the time thing, even when I try to be late I can’t.

    Like

  21. I work for a state agency so overtime is not encouraged. Working off the clock is also not encouraged, so yeah, I get to my desk and punch my time clock (which is on my computer) at 8:00. We have pressure to be here earlier as a rule!

    Like

  22. Depends on the job. In life? I cannot stand people who are late. CANNOT STAND IT – WILL KILL THEM DEAD in my head and never meet with them again. I’m ruthless. Or rather, I’m Paula.

    Liked by 1 person

  23. I, too, work in a law office and have since the Flintstones were the Flintboulders (time passes, things erode…). I’m in between 8:30 and 9:00, don’t answer the phone before 9:30, ride herd on two old coots who rarely drag themselves in before 10:00 and one of them busts out at 3:00. Kind of a sweet gig. BUT I remember the days of 9-5 and I was in before 9 and out after 5. I also wore nylons and heels because one of the hold coots thought productivity was wrapped up in what a person wore. Thankfully, that has also slid by the wayside and we’re MUCH more casual as evidenced by the golf shorts and flip flops that occasionally come in the front door. Bear in mind, it’s just me and the two coots. I’m finally getting them trained!

    On the home front, however, I’m married to man who has arrived at ski areas before the coffee is brewed, gets to parties when the hostess is still putting on her makeup, and prides himself in being the first breakfast customer at restaurants. I’m a long-suffering, bleary-eyed wife who gets places on time, which to me, means a 5 minutes window on either side.

    Liked by 1 person

  24. Like many others have said, all of this should depend on whether there is or is not flex time, whether people are hourly or salaried, and the industry one works in.

    I am salaried. I often get calls after hours/weekends about issues. My workday is “scheduled” as 7:30-3:30 so I feel as long as I’m in my office by 7:30 and stay until at least 3:30 I’m covered. If it takes me a few minutes to take my coat off and put my lunch away, even if I haven’t arrived until exactly 7:30, I don’t care because of all the times I’m working outside those hours. I am also allowed to flex slightly, in that if I don’t come in until 8, as long as I stay until 4, it’s fine.

    Our hourly folks are not even allowed to punch in before 6 minutes to the start of their shift, so even if they came in earlier they couldn’t clock in and it doesn’t matter how long their walk is from the clock to their work area. And if they clock out earlier than 6 minutes before or after the end of their shift, they have to get their supervisor to override that.

    But I totally get while JP-H&B would be irritated. New people need to step and and save the relaxed attitude for once they’ve earned it.

    Liked by 1 person

  25. I’m like you – late to work every day but I work late, work at home in the evenings and on weekends, whatever is needed to get my work done on time. I’m “supposed” to be in the office at 8am (my boss doesn’t care, but technically that’s my start time), but I have to wait with my kindergartner at the bus stop, and her bus comes at 8:15. Right after the bus comes, I dash to my truck and head into work, so I get there ~8:30. I honestly can’t get there any earlier – my kids come first. I don’t have any calls scheduled with customers until 9am or later though, so no one’s waiting on me. And I’m ready to work as soon as I sit down.

    Liked by 1 person

  26. I think everything has changed in the business world the last 15-20 years and what I held on to as the WAY things should be…strong work ethic, working till the job is done, being on time, being loyal to the company…those things kind of went out the window when companies started screwing employees with wages not keeping up with inflation, off the clock work time and the fear that another job will never surface if you got fired AND their lack of loyalty to their long term staff in favor of younger staff coming in at half their salary. None of that happened to me but all you had to do was talk to people in your community and be aware and read a newspaper or two (YES there were newspapers 15 years ago!) to see that wages and loyalty were suddenly broken in a short period of time. Caught a lot of people off guard. So I do understand the cavalier work ethic folks have now with work start time and not working one moment over end time. I also understand how certain businesses absolutely needs all or most staff to be in place at the exact start time. I try to keep up with the times and be understanding of the larger picture. I have to tell myself all the time, keep up with the times or you’ll get left behind and I don’t want to be left behind. Having said all that, thank goodness I do not have to work in a traditional office setting with actual people who are lazy, slobs and so offensive you want to stab them. On the other hand, I miss my coworkers and daily camaraderie and interactions from my former life.

    Liked by 1 person

  27. As a copywriter at an ad agency, I find that the emphasis is often placed on the END of the day rather than the beginning. Clients seem to want last-minute stuff at, like, 4:50, so you have to be willing to stick around and crank it out. It’s a trade-off: I can come to work in whatever the heck I want to wear on non-presentation days, and nobody looks at a clock when I roll in (usually between 9 and 10.) So I agree that it’s 100% related to the job. Employees should adjust their arrival/departure to fit the business as well as their fellow staff members. If your schedule becomes a burden for others, you’re just a dick.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Also as a copywriter at an ad agency, I apologize for putting that period on the inside of the parentheses. Also, I should’ve spelled the % out. Whatever. It’s early.

      Like

  28. My job is all over the place. I am always on the shop floor by start time as my days start with appointments, meetings, or relieving someone’s shift. I also stay late when I have to (worst day ever saw me do a 16 hour shift instead of 12). This means I feel zero guilt enjoying quiet moments with a book or even watching TV.

    I was not raised to be punctual for social situations (Indian time is a thing). I thank my secondary school friends for pulling me up on that and I’m good now. It’s funny to see how this in turn irritates family who thought they would have an extra 30mins or so before I knock on their doors.

    Like

  29. I am a computer programmer, but our job requires so many late and weekend hours that everyone is flexible with their day hours. We are supposed to be here working core hours so we do that but some come in at 6am and some as late as 10am. And I work from home 3 days a week so those times vary as well. As long as we get our jobs done everyone is fine. Lots of times I will work late just to get the work done due to meetings during the day. I’m glad our boss is a very flexible person. We are all salaried though and know that we have to get our work done no matter what it takes.

    Liked by 1 person

  30. I learned the term “time blind” this morning. It is how folks who have ADD/ADHD show how they are oblivious to time. They are never on time, don’t have clue how to budget time, don’t have a clue how long it actually takes to complete a task, and lose track of time while getting ready or doing something enjoyable. While I don’t really like this term, I am sorry to say it applies to me.

    Like

    1. Oooh, that describes my stepmother (fmr). She had absolutely zero concept of time (or money but that’s a whole ‘nuther story) and actually lost a few jobs because she was incapable of showing up for work on time. We tested her on her concept of time by asking her to go about her business for 5 minutes and then tell us when she thought the time was up. About 30 minutes later, she said, “Okay, that was 5 minutes.” During that time, her “But First” Syndrome came out, which prevented her from completing anything.

      Liked by 1 person

      1. I need to be better at that. I really need to look into this “time blind” thing and see what behavior modifications are suggested. Am still floored that it describes me to the T. Just knowing there’s a name to it makes me feel less weird.

        Liked by 1 person

  31. I can clock in (yes, a computerized time clock) up to 15 minutes early before my 8:00am start time. I get paid for doing nothing. It’s an incentive to get employees to get to work on time. I use the time to get beverages…run to the bathroom etc. I also turn on my computer. If my coworkers are late or call in sick, it puts more of a work load on me since we get a lot of customer calls. I make over $200 extra bucks per month by coming in early and earning the overtime. It’s a nice little racket. I would rather have flex time though. Then I’d never care who comes in late…whoo care???

    Liked by 1 person

  32. Oh man, this post scares the crap out of me. I consider it a win if me and kids beat Father down the aisle at Mass. Work wise, I’m expected to be available every minute of my life as the boss, so no time clock for me. As for my reporters, if they get their stuff done, some come in later after kid-to-school responsibilities are done, some early so they can leave earlier. They make their own schedules as long as they meet deadline.

    Liked by 1 person

  33. I can’t stand to be late for anything, it will mess up my whole day. When I worked in an office or hospital I was early, I made sure to do my rounds and make sure the person before me did her job and wasn’t leaving me with a million things that she didn’t do along with all that I had to do. I wouldn’t do that to someone and wouldn’t allow them to do it to me. When I worked in the office I was always a few minutes early, mainly because it would drive me crazy to be late, they wouldn’t have cared. When I did home health, I was on time, occasionally I was late if I got held up with another patient but I tried to schedule for that and I would always call them and let them know that I was running late.
    I’m with Paula on this, especially with being New, this person should arrive a few minutes early and have her ass in her seat on time. Rude

    Liked by 1 person

  34. I’m on Paula’s side when it comes to a new employee being in the door 5 or 10 minutes early to do personal necessities and then butt on chair for the first ring of the phone or the first customer email at 9:00AM. I say this not only as a co-worker who had to field double or triple calls while Bootsie and Clyde rubbed shoulders in the coffee room for 15 minutes, but as a patient who calls the damned ophthalmologist’s office at 9:00AM because they open at 9:00AM and then get the overnight recording until 9:20. Makes me see red is what it does. It also used to gall me when people would start lining up at the time clock 10 minutes before 5:00 and all 20 of them would be punched out before 5:01 hit. Makes me sound like a crank but that is the olden days. I’ve also worked come-and-go jobs where I was treated as a professional and nobody cared about the clock as long as my trainings and presentations were top notch. But new employee, new job, act like you give a darn for at least the first month.

    Liked by 1 person

  35. I think it really depends on your work environment and what you do. If you have a job like a receptionist, you should be at your desk ready to answer the phone and greet people right on time. In other jobs, as long as you aren’t super late and no one is waiting on you to get work done, I don’t think it should matter. Assuming that everyone is professional about it and if you are late, you aren’t also leaving early. In the field I’m in, unless you have an 8am meeting, as long as you’re in the office by no later than 9:30 and you work your 40 hours (and most of us work way more than 40), no one cares. I did once work in an office that was a little stricter about being on time and a co-worker got in trouble for being 15 minutes late after she worked until 1 am the night before trying to meet a deadline. Seemed a little ridiculous to me.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. I agree. Especially if you are receptionist or customer service who answers the phone. I walked in one morning to hear my boss tell someone “How the fuck do I know. I just own the company, the girls run it.” As a manager I was always early because I was taught to set a good example, be diligent, work hard and you will be rewarded. Well I can’t say I was rewarded with anything other than having the satisfaction that I did my very best. I have worked in the construction/development field for the last 30 years of my life and they start early. The phone starts ringing before 7 am. and the calls don’t stop until after 9 pm. I finally put a message on our voice mail that says we only answer calls between 8 am and 5 pm to leave a message because no one respects anyone’s time anymore.

      Liked by 1 person

  36. I had a salaried job where I was not important to getting the day started. I didn’t have any employees under me, I wasn’t front of house, I was kind of my own department within upper management. My boss was a stickler for time. My lunch hour had to take place at the specified time, regardless of if I was in the middle of something. I was to work 8-5. I showed up at 8:02 once and my boss called me on it. I blamed the traffic, as my boss lives in a nearby community and knew that traffic runs such that you either leave really early, making the commute an easy 10 minutes but arriving 45 minutes early, or leave at a reasonably close time and sit in traffic, arriving somewhere between 7:50-8:10. This person suggested I should leave early to arrive at 7:15 and sit and have coffee and chitchat with boss and boss’s assistant for 45 minutes before work every day. Fuck that. I left shortly after. And when my replacement didn’t work out, I contracted with the company several different occasions making more money doing the same work on my own time. I think it’s already generally expected that if you’re into something at the end of the day you’ll stay a little late to wrap it up, but expecting someone to arrive early regularly for no reason at all is overstepping bounds.

    Liked by 1 person

  37. I honestly think it depends on the job. In the beginning I am always eager and excited and early. But morning are my nemesis and, as time goes on and my excitement wanes, I get there later and later. But never ever am I LATE. I work my ass off and have only missed a deadline once and that was only because the person providing me information was late because the person providing her information was late and so on. I kept everyone informed of my status so it wasn’t a big deal. When I worked for A very large company who bought a business line/employees from IBM I was horrified at how late they came in. Sometimes 11, sometimes after lunch…but in the long run it worked to my benefit as they had a liberal work from home policy which I got to take advantage of. I mean not take ADVANTAGE OF, but got to partake in. As a rule, late people annoy me.

    Liked by 1 person

  38. I find being a little early much less stressful than being late. I don’t get to work much early, 5 to 10 minutes, but in plenty of time to get my coffee and get my computer up and running. I don’t mind coming in early if there’s stuff to do, but as a general rule I’m with Fred, sliding on out the door when the whistle blows.

    Liked by 1 person

  39. I’m a June type. Always “late” for my salary job. I too say hoo care. My husband is an H&B type. Gets to work at least 15 minutes early. If not, he thinks he’s late. I annoy him.

    Liked by 1 person

  40. Can I edit my comment? After reading the others I think there’s another element here that annoys. Why do people have to do a little morning get ready routine at work? I may stroll in a minute late, but you can bet I’ve already had my breakfast and coffee and used the bathroom before left my house. I’m not talking about a quick #1, I’m talking about when someone has a daily schedule of heading to the restroom immediately after checking in, taking a newspaper with them. Every place I have ever worked there’s been at least a couple people that spend the better part of the first hour doing things they should have done at home before work.

    Like

  41. I’m with June too. At current job I work with other company facilities that are one or two hours behind my current time. So I usually have no one looking for me at 8:30 and often have everyone looking for me well past 5.

    Like

  42. I agree that it depends on the job but as a manager I can tell you that punctuality does not always equal productivity. I am a firm believer in flex time but with that must come good management. I should know if my employees are producing or slacking off. I hate perceptions. Just because I’m not at my desk by 9:00 every morning does not mean I’m not productive. I’m not a morning person so my schedule varies and I’m thankful for that flexibility.

    Liked by 1 person

  43. I used to a really prompt and even an early person, and I was a stay late person too. But then we moved to Latin America and lived there for 12 years. It rubs off on you, the Mexico Time does. When we first got there we were invited to a co-worker’s home for a party and we showed up AT THE TIME ON THE INVITATION!! Can you imagine? The hosts sent their teenaged son down the street to buy us a beer and some snacks while they got ready. No one told us that the start time on an invite is the time to start showering and getting ready. Anyhoo, after 12 years of that I became looser on my promptness. But just slightly. If it’s 10 or 15 minutes, no problem. If you make me wait or I cause you to wait for an hour, well, that is just plain rude, selfish and insensitive.

    Liked by 1 person

  44. Unless you are the person’s boss, leave it the fuck alone. And even then, sometimes. Times have changed people, and you can’t stop it from continuing to move forward. Never ceases to amaze me how much people care about someone else’s business. Put that concern into something more productive.

    Like

    1. But I think this is good discussion and certainly interesting and enlightening for sure. I don’t think time-conscious commenters here are in other people’s business at all.

      Liked by 1 person

      1. I agree – it is an interesting discussion. Times are indeed changing and that includes all things work related. But that shouldn’t mean do whatever suits you regardless of how it affects those who share your work space. Common courtesy still applies. And there are jobs where it DOES matter that employees show up on time. If that doesn’t meet your personal style, get another job.

        Liked by 1 person

        1. I’m just glad that I don’t work in a cubicle or open space where I have to smell what other people are eating for lunch at their desks. That would make me totally queasy. People’s stories on that in Joob’s comments here over the years have horrified me, especially the coworker who warmed up fish in the microwave and ate it at their desk!! I’m still traumatized by that!

          Liked by 1 person

    2. If a coworker’s habitual tardiness causes you to have to pick up their work, or impedes your ability to get your own work done, it’s definitely your business.

      Liked by 1 person

  45. i’ve had bosses that were clock watchers. interesting they were highly concerned about my start and quit time but were appalled with the idea of a break. i have a very high work ethic (currently taking a work break!) which doesn’t always mean 8 precise hours. the majority of my coworkers for the past 8 years – well, let’s just say it’s rare to see a committed worker that produces quantity and quality. currently i am a contractor which majorly sucks sometimes because i don’t get sick leave, paid time off or holiday pay, but on the other hand i am not expected to work more than 40 hours a week. when i’m at work i work hard. buhheeeyyyyeee!

    Liked by 1 person

  46. Just a fun fact, I used to be a Just Paula about the time and just a general type A crazy person until my mom died suddenly 10 years ago at the age of 59. It really changed my view on things and for the better in my opinion. It helped me live in the moment and not take things so seriously. I am still a great worker but I tend to be a bit like hoooooo care with the little stuff, it isn’t life or death we are talking about. I work in a deadline related field too and have never missed a deadline but I used to be a ball of stress leading up to that deadline.

    Like

  47. When you’re working retail, you have to be on time, or you are inconveniencing your coworkers. So I guess it depends on the type of job, but someone probably already shared that bit of wisdom up there somewhere.

    June! If you have Netflix, watch episode 8 (or 9, not sure) of season 3 of The Dick Van Dyke show. It’s called “Big Max Calvada.” As an It’s a Wonderful Life fan, you’ll understand about 10 minutes in…

    Like

  48. I must agree it depends on the job or business. I was fortunate and had rather flexible work hours for 35 years, then when I went to work for my husband I had to be ready to start work rather early. It does help when you are working from home. We eventually had to set some guidelines for accepting calls because we needed a life. We had a message on our answering machine that any call received after 8:00 p.m. would be returned by 7:30 a.m. the following morning. Being on time for our appointments was imperative and my husband was late one time to an appointment. It was my fault, because I scheduled all the appointments and put the wrong arrival time on his schedule sheet.

    I understand Paula’s frustration and it seems reasonable that a new employee would want to be a few minutes early at least the first month. I also under Paula stressing when her boss is late, because she has to cover for them when clients arrive and the boss is not there.

    Being late to a social event drives me crazy. I don’t want to arrive early, I just want to be on time.

    Liked by 1 person

  49. I struggle with being on time in the morning, more so since having children. I should allow extra time for unplanned issues with the children, but I don’t and that’s totally my fault. I have to work eight hours each day and I do. I work late to make up the minutes I’m late. And sometimes I work more than the minutes I was late because it’s so quiet with everyone gone! There is horrid lady in my office that my husband has named the Crone. When I was new, I was getting to the office 5-10 minutes early each day. She came in 20+ minutes early each day, so I guess she felt I wasn’t there early enough. She stood at my desk one day and announced to my boss that I was late every day. I quickly said I was on time, but oh I was mad. I later found out everyone hates this woman, including my bosses, and nothing she says holds any weight. Still, what a jerk. Now, as she nears retirement (oh how we hope for that announcement), she arrives right on time and leaves a few minutes early.

    Like

    1. I hope you told the Crone to fuck off when she announced that you are always late! I always believe in Karma, and when everyone is happy when she is finally retiring, maybe she’ll see how unliked she was because of her actions.

      I had a coworker who HAD to be the first one in, every morning. She would never comment to anyone about their arrival time, but when she started, she would come in at least 30 minutes early, and if someone else on our floor started coming in earlier than her, she would come in even earlier. She ended up coming in almost an hour early every morning. That indicates to me that you don’t have a life. Heck, I’ll always take an extra hour of sleep over being the first one in to work.

      Like

  50. It was me, right?! I AM the Nervous Perfectionist, right? Oh wait….I am probably the Charismatic Narcissist. I knew it.

    Like

  51. I start a new job in 2 weeks and I was nervous because I wore a dress and suit jacket to the interview instead of a full SUIT suit. I’ve always worked for accountants, ok? Then I get there and everyone is in jeans. The place is an open floor plan filled with millennials and Golden Tee and beanbags and shit. My new boss (the owner) is a former PSYCHOLOGIST. I mean. My boss fmr was completely OBSESSED with time. No idea what to expect at this new job but I’m sensing a more laid-back vibe. WILL I FIT IN STAY TUNED.

    Liked by 2 people

      1. They seem a lot more…TECHNOLOGICALLY ADVANCED than my last job so I should probably limit my Internet Activities lest they find posts about my failed Adventures in Swinging AND SHIT LIKE THAT HI I’M YOUR NEW CFO NICE TO MEET YOU

        Liked by 1 person

  52. As a teacher I had to be on time. (There’s nothing like small children running amok in a classroom without supervision. The horror of it!) However, I did work with one sorry soul who was late every single day and left the parking lot before the buses. She was very unpopular with the rest of the staff.

    Liked by 1 person

  53. I get to work early, but could not care less when anyone else comes in. Actually, I would rather they be late since I come in early so I can get work done without interruption. I’m the office manager, everyone wants something, or just to chat. I need to get work done . Hopeless.

    Like

  54. I was/am always always late… because I can’t stand to be early and bored. I like to come into chaos and get it done! I always/still do, stay late if there is work to be done. I got reprimanded a few times, back in the day. I was raised in chaos and work best that way, when there are deadlines I always met them though. That to me, is what matters.

    Like

  55. I personally am a ‘If I’m not a little bit early, then I’m late’ kind of person, but I don’t hold others to that standard. It’s for my own peace of mind. However, I had a coworker who would come 10-15 minutes late, leave 10-15 minutes early, and then stopped doing any of the small tasks we were responsible for. Pissed me off immensely when he got a promotion we both applied for, but I figure his true work ethic will eventually out.

    Like

  56. Pingback: Book of June

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s