June stresses for no reason

Say yesss! To Martini & Rossi, on the rocks. Say yesssss! Imagine what could be in my brain if ’70s commercials weren’t in there instead.

It’s Monday night, and I’m finally home in my pajamas with a glass of white grape juice because I’m a riveting member of society. Just the IDEA of having wine gives me a Pavlov headache now. So, grape juice in pajamas it is.

Really, my entire goal each day is to get to the part where I’m home in my pajamas for the night.

Just as soon as I got into said pajamas, which I’ve been anticipating all day, did I mention? I got an email about some freelance work I’m doing, and I have to RE-do some of it, because it’s writing, not copy editing, and this is the first time I’ve worked on this particular thing, so I figured it might not be perfect. But I was JUST FINALLY GETTING to the relax part and now I’m tense.

But I’m not gonna work on that now. I’ll think about it tomorrow. I’ll get tense tomorrow. Except I’m tense NOW.

Why?

Today, I went to work, as I am wont to do, and had some harrowing copy editing to do. You’d think copy editing would be all relaxing. Maybe you even say the annoying, “You get to read all day!”

Hah! Right. I mean, make sure Mr. Steiner’s name isn’t occasionally Mr. Stienmen the 86 times we mention him, and remember the client doesn’t like the word sparklefraffle, even though this article is about the Sparklefraffle Fair, and don’t forget to check the name of the city the fair is in because it just changed and we fixed it in some places but not all, and, oh, do this all in five minutes.

What are some misconceptions people have about what you do? Because you know what copy editing rarely is? Relaxing. You’re the very last person to see the thing, so it always ends up getting to you late, and you’re asked to do something like edit 80 pages in an hour and a half, which is not possible, but people think it is because people think I

JUST

READ

a thing. “Oh, you get to read all day!” And I’m sure people’re all, “Well, I could read 80 pages in an hour and a half.”

Sigh.

So what do people think about what you do that is dead wrong?

I hope someone here is a pharmacist so they can tell us why it takes 45 minutes to give me 9 prepackaged pills. I mean, just like how you can’t “copy edit this real quick,” there’s probably a logical explanation for why it takes 45 minutes to give me the same 9 pills I get already packaged in a little foil-and-bubble container every month. It’s not like they have to compound my pills or count them out. But still. I’m giving you the benefit of the doubt, here, pharmacy folk.

weee do not haff jobz. it grate.

Anyway. So I went to work as I am wont to do, and I know I already said that. Then at lunch, I went to the hippie healthy co-op where everyone stands in place before the salad bar, in their politically correct TOMS shoes, in order to feel the vibrations of everyone who passes by or whatever. I grabbed an earth-friendly container made of kelp and mentally stabbed 10 stationary hippies with a bamboo skewer to get them out of my way. I mentally had a hippie kabob. I got me some spinach and some blueberries and some salmon and some beet juice, and $642 later I was out the door.

I thought hippies were busy giving peace a chance and making macramé plant hangers. How do they have money to spend $9,000 on lunch? And yet they all do.

After work, I went to the regular grocery store in my neighborhood where everyone looks like a member of ZZ Top or a ZZ Top tribute band, because I live in what you might call a working-class area now. I much prefer ZZ and his Top to the hippies at the healthy store and I’m sorry.

Anyway, while I squeezed past Ray-Nathan and Bucephalis’s confab about NASCAR and chew, I got yogurt and popcorn and grapes and hummus and cheese, which are pretty much m’staples anymore, and then I came home, fed everyone who contains fur, let the dog out, put the groceries away, did a load of laundry, begged Edsel to come inside and got my coat on and left again.

By the time you read this, it will be Lottie Blanco’s birthday. I wanted to get her a little something, because she’s always feeding me and she got me a housewarming gift and besides, don’t you like it when you get to work and someone’s recognized your birthday, somehow?

So I schlepped to the store to try to find her something, and I like how an entire weekend just yawned behind me and did I do it then? No.

Lottie Blanco is less girly than me, and I know that narrows it down. But the pink sparkly boa I’d have gotten, say, Wedding Alex was not going to fly in Lottie Blanco town.

Anyway, I found a little something for her, and a card, and I hope she likes everything. Then I schlepped back here and let the dog out again because he’s obsessed with something out there, and unloaded the dishwasher and did more laundry and ate some cheese and grapes and had this delicious grape juice, and that pretty much sums up my day and my neck is KILLING me because somehow I made all of this stressful.

Why? Why do I do that? Did that day sound all that stressful?

My freelance isn’t due till Friday and it’s maybe one hour more of work. My commute is six minutes. I met all my deadlines today. Tomorrow is payday and I still have $239 left from last paycheck. I mean, I’m golden! And yet? Shoulders up to my ears.

Why?

Portrait of a needlessly stressed person with stress hair.

Tersely,
JUUN

69 thoughts on “June stresses for no reason

  1. I am a psychotherapist and I work from home. I love going to work in my sweats! But alas, a lot of my clients now want video sessions so I must get dressed. It is fine though as it feels a little better to at least be a little professional. I have never found the need to drive around the block to work though! Ha ha I thought that was funny but – hey, whatever it takes!
    I think that retirement is what kills most people…the boredom of it. So I am all for working till the bitter – or sweet – end!

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  2. I manage a department in a garden center. I MUST love working in a greenhouse that’s freezing all winter and 200 degrees all summer with a 6 week mosquito season, slugs, spiders, snakes and the occasional rat. I do, however, like the raccoons. The flowers are the last thing that get my attention.

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  3. As a nurse people assume you’re running around saving lives and feeling like a hero.

    Sure lives get saved and quality of life gets improved in many small ways.

    I work in surgery which is a money generator for the hospital so we get pushed to hurry and be on time and not get behind on the schedule. Administration won’t hire travelers, yet we can’t find permanent staff. We’re treated like we don’t have work ethic for not wanting to work night and day. The reason for going into this profession is there, but listening to administrators talking about profits and productivity makes me want to go work in a coffee shop

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  4. I feel your pain. I am currently preparing a page/line summary of a deposition of a neuropsychologist for trial coming up Thursday. I haven’t had this much stress in years. And of course, last night I came down with a horrible migraine. I wonder why I said yes to this job, but then I look at the stack of bills waiting to be paid, and I remember. But hey, only 245 more pages to go!

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  5. I’m feeling stressed too. I hate the new Weight Watcher plan. I run out of points by 10:45 AM.
    My dining room is overflowing with unopened boxes of Christmas candy and cookies and beautiful tins of nuts that continue to sing their siren song in my direction.
    My work pants are too tight.
    I asked my hairdresser to dye my hair platinum and dark brown. It is a pinky ashy blonde.
    I can’t wait until Spring…and I’m a winter person.

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  6. “Anyway, while I squeezed past Ray-Nathan and Bucephalis’s confab about NASCAR and chew”…..that there might be the greatest sentence ever in modern American literature. Keep truckin’ June.

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  7. I write web content, and people are all “ooooo, you’re a Writer! That must be so interesting!”
    And bless your soul, no. I write about riveting things such as dental implants and septic tanks. I write what they tell me to write, and it is often very boring.

    I also write some essays and creative nonfiction, because that’s what I love. But here’s how people think that works:
    1. Lock yourself on the attic and scribble your heart out.
    2. Shyly present your masterpiece to the world.
    3. Editors clamor to publish it and you are loved and admired.

    How it actually works:
    1. Scribble your heart out in the midst of chaos and mess because you were doing the damn web copy work instead of cleaning. Be interrupted relentlessly by children, the dog, and the husband.
    2. Revise revise revise revise.
    3. Revise some more.
    4. Beg every publication even remotely interested in your kind of writing to publish it.
    5. Find ever creative ways not to open a vein when they say no or ignore you.
    6. Someone wants your essay! This is the best part.
    7. Spend an eternity hearing what they want to change about it.
    8. See it published and somewhat recognizable as your work. No one really cares.
    9. Invoice for the rest of your life in an attempt to get paid.

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  8. People think that because you work from home, it’s not a “real” job (cough my mom). Yes, I work from home running a very busy construction company. I am HR, A/P, A/R, the receptionist, secretary, Girl Friday, Contracts Administrator, not to mention President/CEO of the Corporation. But because I don’t get in my car and drive to an office, it’s not a “real” job. Maybe, in order for this to feel like a “real” job, I need to leave the house every morning, get in my car, drive around the block, park and then arrive at work, where I will greet my coworkers (dogs) and get a cup of tea and putter around before sitting down at my desk ready to start my work day.

    What’s stressing me out is Quickbooks. I’m self-teaching, and making a lot of mistakes but I have so many questions that I can’t find the answers to, either online or in Quickbooks for Dummies (that’s me!). I looked into taking a class and there aren’t any anywhere near me, which is surprising because it’s not as if I live in a small town miles from the Big City, or the next available class in in May. Gah!

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    • YES! So much this! “Well, you don’t work…” I do, I just don’t leave the driveway to do it. Don’t get me wrong, my flexibility is key to our little dynamic and there are people I would drop anything for, even though it usually results in a 3 a.m. work session. But just because I don’t go to an office means I want to come to your house and wait for your cable person. Grr.

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    • I also meant to suggest a free (or donation based) class service like Coursera for the QB issue. I’ve had great luck with them and they rotate subjects regularly. There’s also one by MIT unless they merged but very diverse and you might find others that cover QB?

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    • I can possibly help you with QB. I’ve used it for years so I know bits about almost all of it at this point.

      If you go to the FB Group, you can send me a PM.

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  9. I just “sit in front of a computer all day”. No. I’m in client services, which is basically Level 3 tech support. So we get all the crap the first two levels can’t figure out. And often the users with the problems are not very nice when you are trying to figure out the issue and fix it for them. In a company with over 4000 end users. It’s fun. :\

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  10. Thank you Georgia! You’re very kind! We do have students who loooooooove us for exactly that reason. But we also supervise students during study hall, and many of them love us much less. Especially when we enforce the cell phone ban.

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  11. I get the whole “Wow, you get to read all day!” from people all the time. About half of my time is spent reading 200 page commercial leases and abstracting them into a one page summary, and the other half is taking a one page summary and turning it into a 200 page commercial lease. It melts your brain like a blowtorch through butter.

    I watch a *lot* of television when I get home.

    Also, your hair does look great.

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  12. Like most things in life your answer can be found in lyrics to a musical. This lesson can be found in the Musical Rent. (You can watch it here. https://www.bing.com/videos/search?q=rent+life+support+youtube&view=detail&mid=53FCEF6449D8A829EFD153FCEF6449D8A829EFD1&FORM=VIRE Only 2 minutes)

    “Excuse me Paul — I’m having a problem with this
    This credo — My T-cells are low —
    I regret that news, okay?
    Alright
    But Gordon – How do you feel today?
    What do you mean?
    How do you feel today?
    Okay
    Is that all?
    Best I’ve felt all year
    Then why choose fear?
    I’m a New Yorker!
    Fear’s my life!”

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  13. I’m a web editor, and people here at work assume it’s such a hard job that we get loads of praise. It’s not really all that hard, so while it’s nice to be praised, it’s definitely not earned!

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  14. Short deadlines are extremely stressful. I would imagine you are constantly having to meet short deadlines. I remember when I had a short deadline it would make me crazy. One morning before I ever put my purse and bags away my team leader said, “quick we have to get a proposed removal letter done before John Doe gets to work, because the U.S. Marshals are in the cafeteria waiting to arrest him!” Holy cow! That threw me right into a panic. There were many other occasions when I had people (our clients) standing over me wanting a document right then while my boss was standing outside my cubicle flapping his arms and doing a marble dance (shuffling his feet on the carpet). It is very stressful. AFTER I was eligible to retire, my boss was flapping and dancing one day about a project I was trying to complete. I finally got a belly full, went into his office, closed the door and said, “have I ever missed a deadline!?” His said, “no”. Then I said, “then WHY do you think I’m going to start now?! Just cool it and get your panties out of a wad!” He left me alone about deadlines.

    You are a thoughtful friend, I’m sure Lottie will love the gift. Your hair looks great.

    Liked by 1 person

  15. Getting something last is the worst because everyone breathes down your neck and drives you crazy. VERY stressful.
    Any job can seem fun and magical if you don’t do it. When I look at complicated but lovely displays in stores I see all of the work behind it first before I can just enjoy it.

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  16. Yes, it does sound like a stressful day. A whole day at work, reading things off a screen on deadline, then errand errand errand plus laundry and animals? Then you rise in the morning, animals, dress for work and somehow find time for a short essay for us (thank you), and back to work. Being tired (and pretty) makes stress easier.

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  17. I think it happens to me anyway, because I feel responsible for the whole world. And everything is my fault. Stress is the juice I live on too.

    Liked by 1 person

  18. In spite of medication, I’m stressed a lot of times, too. I wish I had some advice for you, but I think it’s just a part of some people. Plus also, when you mentioned Lottie’s birthday, I thought you were talking about Lottie the dog and was looking forward to a picture.

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  19. Not a pharmacist, but brother-in-law is and while working at his pharmacy I quickly learned why I would never want to be one. Here’s why your script takes so long:
    -info must be typed in exactly right or insurance will deny it
    -all meds must be checked against other meds you’re taking for adverse reactions
    -deciphering dr’s handwriting is no joke
    -the nurse’s office the pharmacist has been calling for two days finally called back and will only talk to the pharmacist
    -the patient three in front of you has a Schedule 2 drug that requires a double-count and a pharmacist check
    -the patient two ahead of you has a cold and wants to know what she should take. Once given a recommendation, she says “thanks, I’ll run to Dollar General since it’s cheaper there.”
    -the patient one ahead of you wants a price of all the meds before she gets them filled. Which is understandable, but basically means the tech has to do everything twice.
    -the pharmacist has to give advice/converse with patient 4
    -phone rings again, patient Z isscreaming because we “miscounted and shortchanged his narcotic.” We didn’t.
    -A tech called in sick so now pharmacist is scrambling to cover afterwards shift
    -someone asks, where’s the shampoo?
    -another phone call to insurance company to argue why a script should be covered
    Etc., etc. all day long.

    Liked by 1 person

    • Also, I apparently need a personal copy editor because that post definitely could have used a proofread. Oh well, hopefully y’all will forgive my typos and thank your pharmacist the next time you see him or her! It’s a pretty stressful job with most of the credit going to your doctor!

      Liked by 1 person

      • I have very high regards for the pharmacist. If I have questions about any medication I always ask them, not my doctor. When we thought my husband had taken too much morphine (after he fell and cracked his back) I call the pharmacist and told him what was going on. He gave me very specific instructions, we followed them, and in just about ten minutes all was well. Thank God! Never break a morphine pill in half, it makes the half pill stronger. The brochure with the Rx did not provide that information, yet the pill was scored, so I assumed it could be broken without a problem. Big pharma DON’T score pills that need to be taken whole.

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        • The hospice nurse just told him about never crushing morphine pills. She said you can kill yourself with too much.

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    • The insurance companies, ie Satan’s minions on earth plus stupid people. I look for a floor clerk to ask where something is and only after I search hard myself first. My friend’s son is in pharmacy school but he plans to persue the research end, not the retail one. They work twelve hour shifts too with no one to cover breaks in the smaller ones. I knew a diabetic pharmacist who was quitting due to low blood sugars. He couldn’t go get food and when they took too long to deliver it. Scary!

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    • I’ve known a couple of pharmacists. It’s a tough job in a retail enviornment. My friend’s son is attending pharmacy school (a tough, long, expensive endeavor). He plans to work in the reasearch end of the field.
      I am not surprised that the insurance companies make it harder. They are Satan’s minions on earth for me!

      Liked by 1 person

    • I will add though, I worked as a pharmacy tech back in the olden days. We stood next to the pharmacist and read the scripts and banged those things out on a manual typewriter, pulled the drugs for the pharmacist (that were shelved by COMPANY, not drug name coincidentally) and could put any modern day pharmacy to shame. I too ponder June’s question about why it takes 45 minutes pull 9 pre-packed pills off the shelf in the back, slap a computer printed label on them and put them over the counter. I go to a locally owned drug store that seems to have a better handle on this situation, but it still baffles me.

      Devry

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  20. I am a teacher. Whenever I feel stressed I am told to “Just give everybody an A” because then I would be a popular teacher. Or, I am told the opposite, “Just fail everyone.” Yeah. Easy.

    I, like Lisa, Not That Lisa, also just sit around all summer making tons of money. (That is the perception.) In reality I don’t get paid for the summer either, and I usually end up doing all my prep work during the summer because I actually have time to THINK! I don’t have to worry about students or grading. (So I don’t have to just give everyone an A…or fail them).

    When I taught Kindergarten in another life, I was told, “Oh! How cute! I wish I could play all day!” Yeah. That’s exactly what I did.

    Happy birthday to Lottie! You are a thoughtful friend! I hope your stress level is down today and your shoulders leave your ears alone.

    Lovely post, lovely June!

    Liked by 1 person

  21. I have no answer for the stress thing. I stay continually stressed whether things are good or bad—and this is me medicated!

    But I have a question. Does copyediting ever make you NOT want to read? I was a radio/tv/film major and we constantly watched clips of various movies and tv shows. Never the whole thing because we were actually studying (“I’d love to get grades for watching tv all day!”) but for those several years I never watched tv or movies. I think my brain associated it with work and I couldn’t enjoy it. I was always looking for an error or adding to the dialog or designing shots…do you do that with reading?

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    • No, it doesn’t stop me from reading. It’s so NOT reading, really, that I think that’s why. Also, I always see errors. At this point I don’t even think about them.

      Liked by 1 person

      • That makes sense to me. Putting together a tv show wasn’t like watching one, so copyediting is probably more like that. Not like a class where the teacher just ruined the plot for every movie in an entire genre!

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  22. I think it is difficult to understand any job your haven’t done yourself, and then chances are that job has changed or is different in some other way. I try really hard to not form uneducated opinions and to ask more questions and to just listen. I say try, its a work in progress.
    I am not in any way educated in stress and anxiety but I do understand that it doesn’t have to be real to feel real. But wow, the last picture of a stressed woman! You are pretty.

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  23. I prepare proposals and people think I just copy and paste all day. Yes, we have a database of approved information we pull from but it isn’t like those pieces EVER perfectly fit what we are looking for so there is lots of writing to make stuff flow. Oh, and the only reason we have that database of information is because one of us on the team wrote it at one point in time.

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    • I don’t know how I had time to do everything when I worked. It seems like there is something everyday now and it is interfering with my TV lineup.

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  24. People think all you do to make documentaries is walk around with a camera to your eye and “see what you come back with.” To say the least, that doesn’t take into account all the fundraising, outline/shooting-script writing, crew hiring (camera, sound, production assistant, grip, fixer/translator, associate producer, editor, narrator, etc), budgeting and getting budget approved by the founders, scheduling and planning, pitching, editing, script writing, reviews with executives and the resultant major revisions, recording narration, creating graphics, sound mixing, color correcting, etc., that goes along with it. And if it’s an independent documentary – convincing someone to actually show your documentary to other people.

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  25. I’m a librarian. So people assume you and I do the exact same thing. Not quite, folks. Not quite. “Gee I wish I could sit around all day and get paid for it!” Hey, what a coincidence! So do I! And I’m a school librarian so everyone says “oh I’d LOVE to get the whole summer off!” Well, just tell your work you’d like to stay home and not get paid all summer – they just might go for it. Gah.

    I’d say “relax June” but I know from experience how helpful that would be.

    Liked by 1 person

    • I want you to know there is at least one kid out there who loves you more than life! School librarians are magic. Mine would ALWAYS know a good book for me to choose and I read constantly. I was amazed that she knew everything for every single kid.
      Thanks for being a school librarian. It’s a wonderful gift to everyone!!

      Liked by 3 people

    • Shout out to the School Librarians! They were a godsend in my life and now the life of my youngest. I do a similar line of work in an academic setting – and yes, others think I get to read all day.

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    • I was a school librarian for 20 years. I loved working with children but really disliked the tedious paperwork of ordering and cataloging. Ick. And I really hated book fairs! So much flipping work for me. (I still have occasional nightmares about book fairs twenty years later.)

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