105 thoughts on “Tongue

  1. When we got to my grandma’s house if I said I was hungry, she’d make me a raisin bread and cheese whiz sandwich. Not sure if it was something my grandpa liked or what that was about. It didn’t take long to never admit that I was hungry. My mom cooked the rest of the meals when we were there “so grandma could relax.” But I suspect grandma’s cooking wasn’t much better than her sandwiches.

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  2. I don’t remember my grandfather eating any particular sandwich but he ate a lot of coffee toast. He would place a slice of toast in a deep saucer, shovel sugar on it and then cover the whole thing with coffee. Then he would proceed to eat the nasty mess with a spoon.

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  3. Club sandwich. With a toothpick in each half, with that little tangle of colored cellophane at the top of the toothpicks.

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  4. I remember my grandfather eating raw hamburger, with an indent he would crack a raw egg in, between white bread.

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  5. I feel sure it’s already been mentioned but a BLT that is done right is pure perfection. The other is a (deli meat) turkey sandwich BUT the thing that makes it perfect is the right bread (Albert’s 100% Whole Wheat bread) and the proper turkey, provolone and mayo ratio.

    If my husband makes meatloaf, you can be sure I will make a meatloaf sandwich out of the leftovers – yum!

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  6. My dad used to love peanut butter and tomato on toast. I am not a fan of tomatoes, so I never tried it. My husband–he’s an old man, right? He likes peanut butter, bologna, and chip-dip sandwiches. And now…so does my son.

    Gross.

    Lovely post, everyone!

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  7. My grandparents AND my parents ate just about everything that’s already been mentioned, and many of them we ate as kids, too. Especially anything chopped, pickled, fried, or spread.

    But one of my dad’s favorites that hasn’t made the list yet was a brown sugar sandwich – toast the bread, lots of butter and then spread it with brown sugar. Deeeeee-licious. He grew up poor poor poor so that would have been a special treat if my grandma could squeeze a bit out of the budget to buy brown sugar.

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    • My uncle ate something similar – but it did not need to be brown sugar specifically, any type of sugar would do. He grew up during the Depression and then WWII rationing so both sugar and butter were scarce.

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  8. My Polish grandmother made “head-cheese” – and she made sandwiches from it! It was all the brains, etc from a pig or cow and then it was set in gelatin. Oops sorry I hope that didn’t ruin anyone’w lunch!
    Also tongue – my mom cooked one a week and made sandwiches from that. When my kids were young we made “ham salad” sandwiches. They loved it until they found out it was ground up hot dogs and pickles or pickle relish with mayo!
    Husband loved fried bologna sandwiches. I had never heard of them so I made him a “grilled” bologna sandwich – and oh was he upset with me – we were newlyweds! ha ha

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  9. You guys probably have no idea what souse is. So, it is a congealed meat made from the lips ears, etc of a pig. It is delicious on a cracker sandwich according to my late Grandfather. I ate it some as a child and it was tasty until I found out how it was made and with what!

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  10. To me, an Old Man sandwich is leftover meat loaf with ketchup on white bread with a side of potato chips and a glass of ice tea to wash it all down.

    I’m trying to remember any sandwiches my grandpa would eat and I’m drawing a complete blank. And my dad didn’t live long enough to qualify for Old Man status but he did like to eat herring in cream sauce that he’d buy from the nearby Jewish deli, along with bagels and Jewish Rye bread.

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    • A leftover meatloaf sandwich is the best! I also like thick cut bologna with cheddar chesee on wheat bread, mustard and onion slices. And Frito chips.

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  11. My grandfather would take fried sausage patties and put them on white bread, no condiments. He drove a road grader tractor and would stop under a tree somewhere and eat that for lunch and take a short nap every day. I used to love it when I rode with my grandmother to pick him up from work. He would stop the tractor and let me hop on board and ride with him to put it away. When he died all I wanted was his old black lunch pail but they had gotten rid of that when he retired. I got his banjo instead!

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  12. My aunt used to make ground bologna sandwiches. It had mayo and pickle relish in it. Cold or toasted under the broiler. I almost gag just remembering the stench from the broiled ones.

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  13. It’s not old-man food, but I took a tuna sandwich for lunch every day in ninth grade. I still love tuna fish sandwiches, cold or grilled, yum.

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  14. My father was the only old man I knew (no grandfathers alive), and he ate totally normal food. Being from the South, he’d have a request for my mother to make okra once in a while. Ick for me.

    Sometime ago, in my own past, I discovered Underwood Deviled Ham. This turned into a variation of a grilled cheese sandwich — bread, cream cheese, deviled ham, grilled. It was delish, but haven’t had it in a long while.

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  15. Old fashioned loaf with Colby jack cheese and miracle whip on extra thin wheat bread. My grandparents always had this sandwich. I loved that bread, but I could never find it in the store where I live. Once when I was in college, I was walking through the grocery store and a loaf of extra thin wheat bread fell off the shelf right in front of me. It felt like a sweet hello from my grandpa.

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  16. I see the really bad ones have already been mentioned. But my list is here:
    Sardines and onions
    Peanut butter and mayo.
    There is no way in hell I will eat either of those.

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  17. I am like a male dog lifting my leg on so many comments today. I know you are not writing today so it should not work your nerves as much, June Bug. My husband had a co-worker, frmr, who used to say, “Well, slap me on the pee pee!” when he did something wrong. They called him slap me on the pee pee Bruce. I am that but smotpp Annette today.

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    • And too, my old lady neighbor, frmr, whose cats I fed when she was away, took me to the local Jewish deli for lunch as a thank-you once. She ordered tongue and tried to get me to try it. YUCK. NFW.

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  18. My dad was a Campbell’s soup and sandwich man for lunch. Some sandwich selections… pickle loaf, pork and beef loaf, bologna. Occasionally, he would vary and have Vienna Sausages, potted meat, or pickled bologna with Saltines. A couple soup favs were Chicken Gumbo and Bean with Bacon. Ah, I miss him.

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    • It’s still one of my favorites and I have olive loaf in the refrigerator right this moment! I know it sounds icky. I bought some a few months ago just for nostalgia, but then it tasted so good, I bought more.

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  19. My grandparents and parents lived during the great depression. There was no waste in any area of their life, and they saved every thing. When my mom cleaned out my grandmother house she had a storage shed in the backyard full of glass jars like mayonnaise jars she was saving for who knows what. My husband’s mother had jar tops that she didn’t want to throw out, the lack of necessities much have been so great during that era they never got over the lack. I’m sure these recipes were born from that experience. I have a recipe book “Depression Era Recipes” and these are right out of the pages of that book.

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    • Tee, my mom was born during the depression and she never gets rid of anything. Very frustrating as I am an only child and once she is gone, it will take me years to clean out!

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  20. Don’t have time to read the other comments to see if it has been mentioned, but my dad loved braunschweiger sandwiches. Which I don’t think is even made anymore, but it is one of those mystery meat things.

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    • Bee, I think we had the same grandfather. LOL. My dad, every night of my life for as far back as I can recall, would before bedtime, have either cornbread or saltines crumbled up in a glass of milk, which he would eat with a spoon. But my grandfather also was a fan of the fried bologna with mayo and/or peanut butter with banana sandwiches. Always on Mrs. Baird’s white bread.

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  21. I just remembered. My boss when I worked at the bank (don’t get me started on that bank) was an old man and he ordered either chicken salad or tuna salad on white for lunch EVERY DAY. Five days a week.

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  22. Bologna (and yes, I sang the song in my head as I typed that word out) on white bread.

    Maybe yellow mustard?

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  23. Meatloaf sandwich. My former boss is used to order it when we would eat out at one particular restaurant and now it makes me think of older men.

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  24. OMG. I’m reading the comments and am about to hurl. Peanut butter and mayo? Liverwurst and mayo? Barf.

    There was an old character on a TV show that sprang to mind when I read the question. He ate pimiento cheese sandwiches.

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  25. My husband loves potted meat sandwiches with mayo. I refuse to make them. Fancy Feast looks better than that stuff.

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    • My Dad LOVED potted meat sandwiches and pickled pimento loaf. I mean. That was nostalgia Alabama food for him. He’d get excited about it!

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      • Those of you familiar with potted meat, I have a recipe for a dip that uses potted meat that is out of this world. And believe me, I am a finicky, finicky eater. My M-I-L used to make this dip for the holidays. It was pink, but I never knew what was in it. But, boy it was delicious. One time I asked for the recipe and was appalled to learn that it had deviled ham in it and I had been hungrily scarfing copious amounts of it for years. I’m happy to share the recipe on FB if anybody is interested in trying it. It is seriously good! I’m Lisa Miller on FB.

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  26. My dad used to eat fried bologna sandwiches on white bread with Blue Plate mayonnaise. As if bologna wasn’t bad enough, he had to fry it! (We are in Atlanta after all…)

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    • My husband eats exactly this (right down to the blue plate mayonnaise) and so do my children! The whole house smells like fried bologna when he makes it. It doesn’t taste bad, but I loathe smelling it all the live long day!

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  27. Sardines and soda crackers (saltines). My granddad and dad would always take this when they went fishing. There may have been a lot of booze involved, which I think was necessary in order to get a disgusting can of sardines down. Barf.

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  28. Peanut butter an mayonnaise. Or maybe it was Miracle Whip. My dad took them hunting so his fellow hunters wouldn’t ask for any of his sandwiches.

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  29. Another liverwurst entry – with sardines on seeded rye. My dad ate those repulsive sandwiches regularly, even as a young man.

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  30. My dad would take a peanut butter and Miracle Whip sandwich to work every day. The only exception was the day after we had meatloaf for dinner then he would take a meatloaf and Miracle Whip sandwich for lunch.

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