United Hairlines

Today is going to be sort of an odd day. At 9:00, I get my hair colored. Then at 1:45, I scream off to another salon to get my hair cut. I have to go to special curly-girl places to get my hair cut. What can I tell you? You’ve seen the hair. You know what I’m up against.

Then in between those hair sessions, I have to take Edsel to his dog-sitter. Then at 5:40 I fly out of Greensboro and into Michigan. I arrive at 9:30-ish, unless everything gets canceled and delayed and canceled like last time I tried to fly to Michigan. The good news is, I’ll either be canceled here in Greensboro or canceled in Detroit, which means I won’t be completely stranded, like I was in Chicago that last time.

I’m hoping to find a good book at Greensboro’s hard-hitting aeroport, which is totally how you spell that word. Does anyone know of a good one that might actually be in an aeroport gift shop?

I’d better go shower so I am presentable for the hair salon. Salons. I’m only in Michigan through Friday because going was sort of a last-minute decision and there weren’t many flights except “Leave at 2 a.m.” and “Be there for 72 hours only.” So.

All right. I’ll write you from my mother’s computer if I can get to it or if time allows, because relatives. Since you know everyone, I’ll tell you my Aunt Kathy, Uncle Bill, cousin Katie the lesbian and her husband (which makes no sense unless you know the story) and of course my mother and stepfather will be there. I am assuming there will also be Uncle Leo and cousin Maria but I do not know that for sure. Also my mother’s friend Gwen but do not know that for sure, either.

Last year I was there for some event, and Gwen and my Uncle Leo and I ended up in the kitchen laughing hysterically and everyone was mad they were in the other room and missing out on the clearly fun crowd over yonder in the kitchen. I can remember what we were laughing about but I cannot tell it. Now YOU’RE the rest of the family in the other room.

All right. Here I go, for a day of hair and flight.

Flyaway-ly,
June

P.S. Since this whole post left you nothing really to comment on, let’s discuss our least-favorite Thanksgiving food. Always positive. That’s me.

155 thoughts on “United Hairlines

  1. Just sending a random comment to tell you how much I love, love, love your blog. I read you randomly, albeit loyally and find you to be talented, entertaining and such an interesting person while you share random thoughts with us. You are something I am thankful for. Morse importantly, wishing you will meet a random person this year who can appreciate you for all the above because you deserve it.

    P.S. Any awards for the using random frequently and correctly? Let me know.

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  2. My mother makes devine green beans. She boils them a little, then she sautees them in butter and sprinkles them with bread crumbs. They are delicious. Her stuffing is made with stale bread not those crumbs in a bag (I thought I would break a tooth on my mother-in-law’s made with that). It has onions, celery, poultry seasoning and lots of butter. YUM. I also love canned cranberry sauce, some turkey breast with gravy. Pumpkin pie with whipped cream. We don’t have funky vegetables. I have made the stuffing and green beans myself. I got an apple tart at our brand new Trader Joe’s today and I want to try that too. I bought a pie as well. I don’t like meat in stuffing, that is just weird to me. Oysters? Oh, barf. I do like sweet potato fries, mashed sweet potatoes not as much. I just need room for stuffing, green beans and dessert, more than anything else.
    Hope your trip went well, Joon. Enjoy your family time.

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  3. Thanksgiving is also my favorite holiday! I love the comfort food, the comfy clothes and the low-key-ness of the whole day. And it doesn’t hurt to have a day set aside to be grateful.

    Thanksgiving Loves: Mashed potatoes, scalloped corn, dressing, gravy, apple pie, pudding
    Thanksgiving meh: Turkey, candied carrots, freshly steamed green beans,
    Things I won’t eat: Candied sweet potatoes, jelly in the can cranberries, pumpkin pie

    Books I would recommend: Where the Crawdads Sing–my favorite of the summer, The Silent Patient, and Blue Poppy wrote a book! I haven’t read it yet, but I have it on my To Read pile. It’s called Stories for My Sister. Here is the website: https://elizabethduvivier.com/

    Happy travels, June!

    Lovely post, lovely June!

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  4. It makes me a bad vegetarian but my least favorite foods are green beans and brussel sprouts – it’s a texture thing. I guess I can embrace the bad vegetarian status anyway since I ate Jello for years not knowing it wasn’t even close to “green”.

    Safe travels! Hope Edsel has something fun planned with the dog sitter.

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  5. So many things people hate that I love.
    For me? Brussel sprouts and Lima beans are of the devil and I dont care how you make them or fresh or WHATEVER. Hate. I’ve never be related to or in relationship to or friends with anyone who would ever put oysters anywhere. I don’t eat anything out of the water and I agree that they look like snot.

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  6. You guys are seriously cracking me up today!!! Thank you for that! Getting cabin fever from being essentially snowbound for two days now. Thank the gods I have internet.
    I grew up without really “doing” Thanksgiving, but I love pumpkin pie with a quality vanilla gelato. I love baked yams solo (no casserole, no marshmallows, etc.). I’m a vegetarian, so no turkey or gravy. Mashed potatoes? God, yes! I have tasted cranberry sauce from a can and it’s gross. I make my own with fresh cranberries, pieces of oranges, and a bit of agave syrup–just 15 minutes, and ’tis marvelous. Pecan pie texture is gross, and it’s also too sweet. Dentists are rubbing their hands together in glee every time someone takes a bite of that. Things suspended in jello, or jellified? Uh, hello, hell no.
    Even before I was a vegetarian, I was always repelled by seafood, seaweed, and fish. I honestly (not judging, just truly baffled) don’t understand how any human can look at something that looks like a giant insect pulled from the sea and think, Yum, would love to put that in my mouth and chew it up! A lobster is basically a giant spider. Crabs? Shudder. Sea boogers? Hell no.
    I just opened a can of food for my cats and realized: they (always) eat turkey. And my dog’s kibble is bison, and there’s also cranberry in it. So…my animals do Thanksgiving even though I don’t. Huh.

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  7. After 30 years of cooking almost every Thanksgiving meal by myself, I’m happy to say I like all the foods we serve (because I pick them!). We have to be gluten-free and pescetarian friendly. Turkey, salmon, dressing, mashed potatoes, gravy, mashed sweet potatoes with ginger, green beans almondine, cranberry orange relish, dinner rolls and GF dinner rolls, pumpkin pie, and a fruit pie (this year it will be apple cranberry) made in the convenient frozen GF crust.

    My least favorite Thanksgiving food from childhood was pickled herring. My mother used to make so many swoony yummy sounds when she’d slurp up a piece 😦

    BeeBelle

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  8. I didn’t mention marshmallows because they are not a Thanksgiving food. They are Satan’s hemmorhoids. I have no use for them or their stringy sticky offspring, Fluff. Everything marshmallow is revolting, including s’mores and moon pies. This is possibly because I am a city kid, a northern city kid at that, so never had s’mores until I was too old. And I don’t think moon pies are allowed to cross the Mason Dixon Line.

    I had never even heard of oyster stuffing and am now horrified. Surprising exactly no one, I do not eat oysters, mussels, clams or anything else that looks like a cow sneezed in an ashtray.

    Jello is similarly not allowed Chez Moi because it is sneaky, too colorful and not to be trusted. It can call itself aspic all it wants, it’s JELLO. Get over yourself, Aspic.

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    • I’m a Southern girl, but never got the fascination with s’mores. I ate Moon Pies as a kid, but not as an adult because there are so many better choices.

      I probably should have signed in as Anonymous as I may lose my Southern standing with this comment.

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      • Mallomars are the shit (YUM) as are the fancy similar ones with raspberry jelly in them too. I adored mallow cups, still do in fact though I need to avoid sugar. I have no hate for marshmallows at all but the Satan’s hemmorhoids thing killed me, ditto the sneaky jello which I love too. I am also another Northern city kid.

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  9. THANKSgiving is my favorite holiday. Cornbread dressing with sage is a must, pickled green beans (my grandmother was raised in western NC and this was one of their traditions at Thanksgiving and Christmas), and pumpkin chiffon pie, it’s light and fluffy rather than like traditional pumpkin pie. I could care less for the rest of the traditional foods, I will eat the other foods, but if we don’t have those three foods mentioned it’s just not right.
    I have no book recommendations, but I hope you have a safe trip with no delays and great fun with your family.

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  10. I’m getting a kick out of everyone’s comments. Who knew there were so many despised Thanksgiving foods? My favorites family traditions are Mr. Sadie’s dressing, my stepdaughter’s squash casserole and my brandied sweet potatoes topped with a combination including butter, flour, brown sugar and pecans. Who needs marshmallows when you can have pecans? And brandy? And Tee is correct. I use the red sweet potatoes, not yams. Another favorite is the raw cranberry salad I make with a naval orange, celery, pecans and sugar or sweetener, but no jello.

    Like Mel, my stepdaughter avoids celery like the plague. So her least favorites are Mr. Sadie’s dressing and my cranberry salad. That’s why we also serve the canned jellied cranberry sauce that slides out of the can. Her favorites are turkey and mashed potatoes, covered in gravy.

    While I’ve never had oyster dressing, I understand it is traditional in some families. And for others, it wouldn’t be Thanksgiving without oyster stew. So there you go. Everyone has their own traditional foods.

    Happy Thanksgiving!

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  11. Green bean casserole – I have never understood why it is so popular! I tried making it with fresh green beans – just quit doing it. But some people love it so that is ok! One T Day about 2011 I think – someone was really drunk and made that casserole. That was the one that did me in! lol.
    Have a great time June! hugs

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    • I made the green bean casserole one year when we had Thanksgiving at my in-laws. Everyone went nuts over it, which surprised me until I remembered that they were the casserole-from-a-can crowd.

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  12. I love everything at the Thanksgiving table except the jello molds/salads. Nothing against them any other day but on Thanksgiving whatever is on the plate will be (and should be) touched by gravy. Jello and gravy do not mix.

    I am grateful for all the good book recommendations. I am reading Me by Elton John and who knew he was such a temper tantrum throwing Jack ass!

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    • Everyone. Everyone knew Elton was a temper-tantrum throwing jackass. There is a documentary about him called “Tantrums and Tiaras” directed by his now-husband. So yeah, Elton is a well-known Diva.

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  13. My least favorite Thanksgiving food is the unpeeled chunked butternut squash with some really funky seasonings that my daughter in law made at her house last Thanksgiving. She flirts with veganism so this was her substitute for turkey. Luckily, my son deep fried a turkey for the rest of us.

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  14. I second “The Dutch House” recommendation. I did the audio and Tom Hanks read it — made it even better. I have The giver of stars on my list, and I’m too chicken to try Educated (I get disturbed easily) but have heard from everyone that it is great. All of these are newish so should be in the airport. Also just finished “Things you save in a fire” and it was kind of a nice fluffy book. I say that although it has cancer and assault etc. in it. It just was easy to read.

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  15. I just finished reading (listening to) The 100-year Old Man Who Climbed Out the Window and Disappeared by Jonas Jonasson. It’s initially set in Sweden, but goes all over the world and is laugh-out-loud absurd at times. Definitely worth the read.

    Oh, and I despise stuffing and sweet potatoes. More room on the plate for turkey, potatoes and gravy!

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  16. that disgusting orange sweet potato casserole with marshmallows, that’s the worse.

    Green bean casserole — I’ll eat all of the casserole the rest of you don’t take.

    Book: “The other side of the coin” by Angela Kelley. Released Oct. 29. The author is Queen Elizabeth’s official dresser-person-assistant and the book has the queen’s blessing. It’s on my Christmas list.

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    • Are you me? That disgusting sweet potato casserole is the worst for me as well. And I just finished “The Other Side of the Coin.” It was very interesting and it’s clear that Angela Kelley and The Queen have a very special relationship.

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  17. I’ve tried to post this comment 3 times via my WordPress sign in and it never posts, and once it even told me “oops! we detect a duplicate post”…yet, no post.

    So here is my “anonymous” post.

    I love Thanksgiving! It’s jut so laid back with family and friends, with no pressure of gifts, and low key decor in beautiful autumnal colors, and special foods that I look forward to all year. For me, it just isn’t Thanksgiving without certain dishes like my mom’s broccoli rice casserole, my grandmother’s sweet potato casserole, or my other grandmother’s pecan pie (the only one I’ll eat) and her famous cornbread dressing. There have been a few times I didn’t get to have what I grew up with, but it was okay with me, because it was never anything weird, and most of my favorite things were there.

    Except that one time.

    When we were first married, my husband and I lived in deep south Louisiana (Cajun country, as in they speak Cajun French, the stop signs are in French and English, the food is very unique, etc) where a lot of his extended family lives. We had only gotten married the previous month, so instead of making the long trip to my family’s Thanksgiving, we planned to gather with his side at his grandmother’s for our first Thanksgiving together, and his mom came into town to help her handle all of the prep. I offered to bring a dish and suggested I could make my grandmother’s dressing. She said, “Oh no, I’ve got the dressing covered. Why don’t you make _____?” I don’t remember what it was at this point, but I agreed, as it was something simple and no big deal.

    So on Thanksgiving Day, all the people are there, with the table set beautifully, and the house all warm and delightful, and all the food laid out in all its glory. As I’m making my way through the serving line, I don’t see the dressing. I ask my mother in law, and she points to a dish with meat and rice, saying, “That’s the dressing, dear.” A first for me, but no big deal. Rice is big in that area so it made sense. I’m adventurous! I’m newly married! I’ve had Cajun food before! I will live!

    So I sit down with the crowd to eat, talking, laughing, enjoying the day, and take a bite of the rice dressing and…

    nearly spat it out across the table.

    That wasn’t just rice dressing! That was OYSTER rice dressing!! There were OYSTERS hidden in the meat mixture with the rice!!!

    OYSTERS!!!!!

    SEA!!! BOOGERS!!!!!!

    I, thankfully, didn’t make a visible scene, but later told my husband that I missed my grandmother’s CORNBREAD dressing and he looked at me like I was nuts. He said he had never heard of it, that they had always had the oyster dressing. I said, “ALL OF AMERICA has NEVER had OYSTER dressing for Thanksgiving! It’s always some sort of grain like French bread or cornbread and THERE IS NO SEAFOOD INVOLVED!! Y’all are backwards!!”

    At some point he told his mom that I don’t eat her rice dressing because I don’t like oysters, so now she makes me my own pot of dressing without oysters. Which does not solve the problem as it does nothing to satisfy my need for my grandmother’s famous, traditional, southern American cornbread dressing (I still eat what she makes for me though because it’s so sweet of her to try to accommodate, and it is good…but only without the oysters).

    Anyway, I started bringing cornbread dressing whenever we have Thanksgiving with his side of the family. The very first time I made it, his dad said, “Oh my gosh. That’s like what my mom used to make. It’s like I’m back in Tennessee!” He almost cried. I don’t think my mother in law ever made anything else. Like they really thought it was normal, American Thanksgiving food. This could be why his parents divorced.

    So that’s what I hate at Thanksgiving. Oyster dressing.

    Liked by 5 people

    • Vindicated, anon from French /Cajun land thanksgiving, cornbread dressing is the bomb, and your father-in-law knew it. Love that story. Good for you for being a good sport to your mother-in-law , nice of you.
      Doesn’t hurt folks to try new things they have never had. Unless, you are surprised by hidden oysters and think they are sea boogers. Gross, but apt.
      All of the comments today have made me grin big time. Such good folks here. Thanks June for being the magnet.

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    • I’m from Louisiana, not cajun country but we do love our oyster dressing for Thanksgiving. Although never in my life have I heard of it with rice. I think I would have spit that out too, oysters and rice do not blend. Now my husband wants his cornbread dressing so I also make that.
      Oyster dressing with rice
      🤢🤢🤢

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  18. Least favorite is that giblet gravy stuff. Yuck! Love me some sweet potato anything. You guys must not have access to really good ones because one of our favorite things is to just bake them and slice open and eat the insides. And they are sweet and creamy! I always get the more red fleshed round ones though instead of the skinny pale ones.

    Books: I will vote also for ‘The Giver of Stars’ and ‘The Bookwomen of Troublesome Creek’. Both are based on the horseback librarians of Kentucky. ‘Educated’ is also good as is ‘Maid’. And ‘Where the Crawdads Sing’ was one of my favorites this year along with ‘Miracle Creek’ and ‘The Silent Patient’.

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  19. Might I suggest Howard Stern Comes Again?

    I love almost every food (why so hefty?) so I cannot think of any Thanksgiving food that could be deemed my least favorite. I am anticipating my MIL will provide beverages. Last Christmas that consisted of two 20oz bottles of soda. One coke, one diet. For 10 people.
    “Everyone line up for your soda shot!”

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  20. Find “The Gown.” It’s a novel that revolves around the making of the then Princess Elizabeth’s wedding gown. AMAZING!

    Not a fan of pumpkin pie, mince meat pie, or pecan pie. Spare me the yams, sweet potatoes, and that cranberry crap. Mashed potatoes and gravy however? I’ll take a vat please.

    FYI, growing up, we always had Mexican food for Thanksgiving. Usually enchiladas, but occasionally tamales, with all the fixin’s. Which included apple pie because we lived in an orchard.

    Have fun, Coot!

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  21. “United Hairlines” Ha! I love all Thanksgiving delights, so couldn’t think of one I didn’t, except when Paula mentioned mincemeat. Tasted that once and bleh. So, that one. Have a fabulous Thanksgiving with your family.

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  22. Potatoes. Can’t stand them mashed, or candied, or casseroled which is how they are always made at Thanksgiving. I’ll take double stuffing, thank you.

    Safe travels!

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        • I love mashed potatoes but can honestly say I have never seen them on the table at Thanksgiving (and I am OLD). My family is devoted to sweet potatoes covered in a divine pecan/coconut/other stuff concoction that was really more like a dessert than a side (but in the South a lot of things resemble desserts!).

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  23. I love mincemeat, but that’s a Christmas thing in my family. I feel the need to defend it because it’s yummy. Stir it into hot oatmeal!

    What I despise about Thanksgiving food is how much celery is in everything. It’s crunchy water. It smells like death. It has strings in it. It’s disgusting. It tastes like despair. It ruins everything it touches.

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  24. Mashed/riced cauliflower trying to be mashed potatoes. There – I said it! If you’re on the keto diet and don’t want starches – fine – but don’t go bringing your sad cauliflower mush and pass it off as mashed potatoes. That is disrespectful to the potato. What did a potato ever do to you? Potatoes bring joy – releasing serotonin and endorphins into the brain. [So does cheese.] Cauliflower just makes you wake up at 3 AM reliving every regretted decision in your life.

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    • Turkey is my least favorite. Not really a big meat fan. And turkey is about the meh-est of the meh. It has no taste, other than “dry”.

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    • Cauliflower is gross. Whether it’s steamed, riced, mashed, roasted, whatever, it’s still gross. There’s just such a funky aftertaste, like rotten farts or something.

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  25. Not a fan of congealed salads. Why people gotta take perfectly fine Jello and put other food in it? It just makes things weird for everyone.

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    • “Congealed” is a dreadful thing to put in the name of anything that’s supposed to be edible. However, I love my friend Bobby’s designation of Green Bean Casserole as “Bean Gunk,” and I liked it when she made it for me one year when we were snowbound in Minneapolis.

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  26. Did you know the weather right be rough?

    *Ducks*

    Have a lovely Thanksgiving with your family. And I sure hope the flights are in your favour this time.

    Mmmm. Favourite T-day food…I can’t chose! I have to have the mix of stuffing, gravy, mash, corn, and cranberry sauce. Not stirred up together literally, but they all have to be on the plate.

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  27. The traditional Thanksgiving meal is my least favorite meal all around. I like the gravy, stuffing and sweet potatoes but the rest can go. I always take some turkey to be polite and some mashed potatoes so I can get the gravy because I believe putting it in a bowl to eat like soup would be frowned upon. Also, I’m not a fan of pumpkin or apple pie.

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  28. I had to Google this Green Bean Casserole that everyone is disparaging. OH MY SWEET LORD. Cream of mushroom soup? Canned fried onions? That? is prison food. I’d say “no offense,” but I don’t think anyone in the comments has liked it.

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  29. My family used to serve tomato aspic. Basically tomato gelatin. Disgusting. Wasn’t sad when that generation dies off. And I haven’t read it, but everyone raves about “Where the Crawdads Sing”.

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  30. Don’t love or like the cooked brussels sprouts, no matter how much they are roasted or caramelized. I do love them raw & dressed like coleslaw.

    Weather conditions for Mpls: lots of snow, lots of snow, lots of snow. I canceled my PT appt for Friday, as I’ll be shoveling for two days instead, which will be so awesome for my injured rotator cuff.

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  31. I loved All the Light We Cannot See. I love all Thanksgiving foods. Have a great trip! Also we never have seen a picture of your new couch in your house.

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  32. I was gonna say Educated but commenting late. Letting a few kids skip school because I am being a germ a phob. Curly dances in irish dancing championships on Sunday and I do not want any germs to mess her up.

    I do not like gravy. I cannot each much Thanksgiving food anymore, thank you celiac disease. I wonder if we should count how many times I reference celiac in your comments. Sorry. Safe travels. Sorry you were stranded in Chicago and you did not have my cell #- I would have come to pick you up!

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    • Oh, Mr. Texas has Celiac Disease so I KNOW! Here are a few tricks: Trader Joe’s has a g/f Stuffing Mix Kit that makes excellent dressing! While everyone else has real gravy you can have your own. Look at the grocery for Pioneer g/f brown gravy mix with the packets of gravy and sauces. Need Cream of Mushroom/Chicken soup for recipes? Get Pacific brand. Comes in a little square box. It won’t make your recipes as thick as Campbell’s but it will taste the same. In the freezer section you can find frozen g/f pie crust. If you want to make your own, there is a brand called Cup4Cup that has prepackaged mix . Honestly there are some things that we adapted to be g/f that we now prefer. Things without flour are less filling so we can eat without that gross overfull feeling.
      Hope this helps you and other bewildered g/f folks!

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  33. I don’t understand how green bean casserole became so popular. As children we were only allowed to say, “I don’t care for it. Thank you.” My mom didn’t welcome vomiting noises at the table; maybe I’ll try and see if she’s eased up on the rules.

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    • I loved green bean casserole as a child, mostly because it didn’t taste much like green beans. I don’t care for it anymore.

      BeeBelle

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  34. Turkey. Although I’m an avid reader, I have no idea what book would be in an aeroport gift shop. Have a wonderful time, Joon.

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  35. I’m on the “Green Bean Casserole is of the devil” train.

    Also if you can find it, “Code Name: Verity” by Elizabeth Wein is an excellent book.

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  36. Exhalation by Ted Chiang is really great writing and short stories, so you can put it down and pick it up. I enjoyed Doctor Sleep, which I got at an airport bookshop, but it only works if you like horror/Stephen King and have read or watched The Shining.
    Outlander, if you want to get sucked into a series of mammoth books.
    Little Fires Everywhere
    Olive Kitteredge, if you haven’t read it

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    • I just finished Olive Kitteredge because it was so highly reviewed, and while it was beautifully written, it was too depressing for me. I just kept internally shouting “all old people are not like this!” I’m on the wait list for Olive, Too but am not sure I want to read it.

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      • I felt the same way about Olive Kitteredge. The author is very talented (and I’ve read other of her books), but I remember that reading Olive K. made me sad.

        “He wanted to put his arms around her, but she had a darkness that seemed to stand beside her like an acquaintance that would not go away.”

        “And then as the little plane climbed higher and Olive saw spread out below them fields of bright and tender green in this morning sun, farther out the coastline, the ocean shiny and almost flat, tiny white wakes behind a few lobster boats–then Olive felt something she had not expected to feel again: a sudden surging greediness for life. She leaned forward, peering out the window: sweet pale clouds, the sky as blue as your hat, the new green of the fields, the broad expanse of water–seen from up here it all appeared wondrous, amazing. She remembered what hope was, and this was it. That inner churning that moves you forward, plows you through life the way the boats below plowed the shiny water, the way the plane was plowing forward to a place new, and where she was needed.”

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    • Oh, but WAIT. My family makes a sweet potato souffle that has BANANAS BAKED IN IT. And it looks all pretty and delicious with brown sugar and pecans on top, so one takes a spoonful and then gets a mouthful of sweet potatoes AND COOKED EFFING BANANAS. It’s like a baby food dirty trick, not that even Gerber would put bananas with sweet potatoes.

      Another misnomer, btw. “Sweet,” my eye. Sweet potatoes are not to be trusted. They are the prison inmates of the potato world and should be in solitary. IMO.

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  37. I really enjoyed “My Sister, the Serial Killer” if that is at the airport. I hate sweet potatoes. It’s the texture, so smooth and silky. That is not a texture for savory food.

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  38. No book recommendations, sorry to say. Cancer treatment has taken all of our money, so the only book purchases we are able to make come from a place called Lucky Dog Books. I consider ourselves lucky dogs to have access to Lucky Dog Books, where the most expensive book is only $3! But, as one might suspect, no NEW books on the shelves there.
    I hope that all your hair appointments result in the exact ‘do you’re wishing for. Also, I hope that Edsel is able to have some fun playing with friends while you’re out of town.
    I am no fan of pumpkin anything, and although I adore gravy (why so fat, Lisa?), I totally detest the giblets that are used in the making of giblet gravy. Yuck! Finally, despite the fact that I do love me some cabbage, their fart smelling brussel sprout cousins are not finding their way onto my plate!
    I love, love, love Thanksgiving and am looking so very forward to it. This time last year is when my dear husband was diagnosed with Cancer, so 2018 was an unhappy holiday season for us. I am determined that 2019 is going to be joyous! I hope that you June, and all of your lovely followers also, find this to be a an inspired and wonderful holiday season. Have a safe and fun trip!

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    • I read nonstop when I was in chemo. But I found that after it ended, I had no interest in re-reading those books or continuing on with the series. And normally I love to reread. I’m fortunate enough to have a great public library nearby and they do a “hey, you’re sick, we’ll bring you books!” thing. I’m sure that’s exactly what they call it.

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  39. The Grammarians by Cathleen Schine. It won’t be at the airport. Could you buy a kindle edition and read it in the kindle app on your phone?

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  40. Oyster Dressing. Made to eat it as a kid. Turns out that yucky feeling I had when eating it was mild anaphylaxis. No more oysters, shrimp, lobster or crab for me…only sad about the crab.

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  41. High wind warning for NW Ohio on Wednesday and rain fyi which should make for a comfortable flight.
    The only kind of stuffing I like is Stovetop – the rest is garbage.

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    • My “secret” about making Thanksgiving stuffing is I buy Stovetop, use the full amount of butter called for (which I sometimes don’t do for regular meals) and gussy it up with onions and celery for texture, which Stovetop doesn’t normally have. I’ve made it by buying bags of unseasoned bread croutons and cooked it with broth and added the butter and spices and onion and celery . . . and it’s boring. It’s too dry and not flavorful enough. I’m making the turkey, too, even though dinner is at my Mom’s house, so I don’t feel a bit guilty about my stuffing shortcut. ~ Laura

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  42. I like all the Thanksgiving foods that I serve now that I’m in charge, but my MIL used to insist on a green salad before the meal which WASTED SPACE MAN. I can eat salad any other day of the year, and generally do. Leave me room for the stuffing, gravy, and cranberry sauce. Plus HOMEMADE ROLLS! My big extended family includes things like buttered noodles and red cabbage which I can do without. And I know it’s weird, but if I had to give up one thing from my Thanksgiving plate, I’d 86 the turkey.

    Safe travels June!

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  43. I haven’t read it yet (it’s on my shelf), but The Giver of Stars by JoJo Moyes looks good — it’s about women who ran a traveling library in Kentucky in the 1930s. Educated is good, but horrifying. I read it with my work book club earlier this year. I’m not sorry I read it, but it was tough going. ~ Laura

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    • I really liked TGOS. It was well-written and about a subject I had never heard about. If you enjoyed reading about those women, The Bookwoman of Troublesome Creek was fascinating. But June will not find that at an airport bookstore.
      Least favorite turkey day food is the jellied cranberry sauce.
      Safe travels, June.

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    • I thought Educated was very good but one of the most depressing and horrifying books I’ve read in a long while. A family of batshit crazy religious nutjobs and that brother was a full-blown psychopath. After I finished, I thought, “That girl needs some major therapy to help her deal with the trauma and abuse her crazy-ass family put her through” but sadly, she will never escape from them.

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      • It made me so sad that this was a true story and that there are likely many other children living with families like this who won’t ever find their way out with a chance at a different life. One of my sisters was having a rough day recently and told me she was reading Educated while waiting for an event to start. She said it was a hard day, but at least no one was heaving scrap metal at her head. ~ Laura

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  44. Least favorite Thanksgiving food: Any pie, but most particularly pumpkin. At least with the others, there is something to like, but with pumpkin, the entire thing is horrid. Oh, and mincemeat. WTAF is that anyway? Not sure I want to even think about it. Also: mashed potatoes, if the chef has added Any Form of Cheese. That chef should be shot on sight for defiling the purity of the potato.

    My mother used to make the most delicious turnips (you wouldn’t think “delicious” and “turnips” would go together, but stay with me). The dish was “Smashed Turnips” with cream, butter and rum. Then she decided to start eating “healthy” (which I always thought should’ve been “healthily”) and started using rum *flavoring* (an abomination), skim milk (unspeakable) and probably skipped the butter altogether. So then that delicious turnip dish became, “oh, right. the turnips. sigh.”

    Plus also too, turnip is a cute name and should have been assigned to a cute little vegetable, not to that blob that looks like it is suffering a migraine. Plus also too again, why are parsnips and turnips so close in name when a parsnip is similar to a freaking carrot? Total fuckup there. Clearly parsnips should have been named parrots and then that opinionated bird would get a different name altogether. No one thought this through and don’t even get me started on grapes and grapefruit.

    Well. Have now gone completely off the rails.

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  45. I love all Thanksgiving food and the leftovers.

    May you have safe travels, few delays and no cancelled flights.

    Happy Thanksgiving to all and to all good eats.

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  46. My mother will insist on bringing baked beans which is her “signature dish”. She will them demand I take whatever is in the oven out of the oven so she can heat her beans. Screw the turkey, those beans have to be heated. This year I bought an extra crockpot and her damn beans are going in the crockpot. So, Ima say her baked beans are my least favorite.

    Happy Thanksgiving, everyone! Safe travels, June.

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  47. LEAST favorite Thanksgiving food: jellied cranberry sauce from a can. My grandmother and my mother always made a cranberry sauce recipe that called for cranberries, oranges, pecans, celery and pineapple in cherry jello. Yes, in the south we take any healthy food (like cranberries) and make it as full of sugar as possible. Yum, yum!

    Books that MIGHT be available at the aeroport: “Before We Were Yours” by Lisa Wingate and “All the Light We Cannot See” by Anthony Doerr. Both REALLY good and hard to put down.

    Safe travels – can’t wait to hear about your trip!

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  48. If you like psychological thrillers, “The Wife Between Us” will have you going back and rereading the first half. Mind blowing good!

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  49. Have you read Educated? It’s a good read and has been popular, so they might have it at the airport. Least favorite Thanksgiving food? Hmmm…..My brother-in-law-law always brings rutabaga. I’ll guess I’ll go with that

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  50. Not really a fan of pumpkin pie. Vegetables don’t belong in a pie unless its a pot pie. Have a great trip. I’ll be thankful for you from the other side of Michigan.

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  51. June, Ask Again, Yes by Mary Beth Keane is excellent! It’s fairly new so it should be in the airport. Happy Thanksgiving 🦃

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    • Baked sweet potatoes/yams…hate it.

      Changing the subject … I was looking at mortality charts and from what remember… females born in Michigan live the longest when compared to all females and males living in the U. S. Or… was that only if you are born and remain living in Michigan?

      Happy Thanksgiving!

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